Book Review of The Prophets by Robert Jones, Jr.

The Prophets by Robert Jones, Jr.

400 pages

Published: 1/5/21 by G.P. Putnam’s Sons

ISBN: 9780593085684

Genre: Historical fiction

Rating: 4 out of 5.

B&N | Amazon

*Click on photos to view original source.

“A singular and stunning debut novel about the forbidden union between two enslaved young men on a Deep South plantation, the refuge they find in each other, and a betrayal that threatens their existence.

Isaiah was Samuel’s and Samuel was Isaiah’s. That was the way it was since the beginning, and the way it was to be until the end. In the barn they tended to the animals, but also to each other, transforming the hollowed-out shed into a place of human refuge, a source of intimacy and hope in a world ruled by vicious masters. But when an older man—a fellow slave—seeks to gain favor by preaching the master’s gospel on the plantation, the enslaved begin to turn on their own. Isaiah and Samuel’s love, which was once so simple, is seen as sinful and a clear danger to the plantation’s harmony.

With a lyricism reminiscent of Toni Morrison, Robert Jones, Jr. fiercely summons the voices of slaver and the enslaved alike to tell the story of these two men; from Amos the preacher to the calculating slave-master himself to the long line of women that surround them, women who have carried the soul of the plantation on their shoulders. As tensions build and the weight of centuries—of ancestors and future generations to come—culminate in a climactic reckoning, The Prophets masterfully reveals the pain and suffering of inheritance, but is also shot through with hope, beauty, and truth, portraying the enormous, heroic power of love.”



Triggers: Rape, abuse (physical, mental, emotional), lynching, death / murder (adult and child), animal sacrifice, slavery, racism, manipulation, loss of a loved one. Proceed with caution.

This was a difficult book for me to rate, not that the rating of a book like this is important. The importance comes from the incredible messages this story delivers. The main issue, and probably the only issue, I had with this book was the confusion I felt after finishing a few of the chapters. I’m not a critical reader, and sometimes I feel like because of that I shouldn’t review books. There’s always a little bit of impostor syndrome in me. Regardless of what kind of reader I am, I couldn’t give this five stars due to the reason mentioned. I couldn’t quite catch on to the concept. I don’t know if I should know more biblical references to understand it, but this book didn’t really do anything to ease the confusion. But, it’s incredible other than that.

There are a lot of characters to follow with this one, so taking notes couldn’t hurt the reading experience. I didn’t get them confused at any point, which I can always appreciate with a story of this stature. I will note that you don’t only follow the slaves. Following the whites of the story is very cringe and rightfully so. It’s also hard to read as far as content. There were points where I wanted to put it down for good, but not in a “I hated the book” way. It’s just so heartbreaking that these events happened/still happen. If I could snap a finger and make it go away, I would.

I don’t want to forget to mention the highlight of the book, the LGBTQ+ representation. That’s mainly what the story is about—Samuel and Isaiah (The Two of Them). I don’t think we got to see enough of them and their relationship because there are so many characters, but that doesn’t mean I didn’t deeply care for them. They didn’t always see eye-to-eye, but the love and admiration they had for each other was commendable. Oh, the ending will get to you if you end up loving these characters. It’s a tragedy, for sure. I was actually prepared for that, and I hope that I can prepare you for that if you haven’t read this yet.

This won’t be a book that everyone will enjoy based on how it’s written, and the fact that it’s character-driven. Sometimes character-driven books aren’t for me, but this one was well done. It wasn’t my favorite part of this novel just because there were so many characters. I just appreciate the message and the honesty. It’s heartbreaking, harrowing, brutal, admirable, and powerful.

Is it revolutionary?

I would think that’s also based on preference. It’s not for me but it’s damn near. It just seemed so original from anything I’ve read. The writing itself isn’t hard to understand. There’s great description and dialogue. I read that some people thought it was slow, but I was flipping pages like a madman. The relationships between the characters are incredibly fleshed out. I think it’s an important novel for our modern day, and whether or not you enjoy it subjectively, it undoubtedly packs a punch.

My favorite quotes:

“She knew that they purchased everything except mercy.”

“The scars lined them the way bark lined trees. But those weren’t the worst ones. The ones you couldn’t see: those were the ones that streaked the mind, squeezed the spirit, and left you standing outside in the rain naked as birth, demanding that the drops stop touching you.”

“Water done wore away at her stone, and the next thing she knew, she was a damn river when she could have sworn she was a mountain.”

“Whenever and wherever nothing encounters something, conflict is inevitable.”

“But how? How could they not need more of everything: more love, more life, more time?”

“How dare nature continue on as though his suffering didn’t even make a dent, like the bloodshed and the bodies laid were ordinary, to be reduced to fertilizer by insects and sucked up by crops. No more than cow dung in the grand scheme. Same color, too.”

“There could never be peace, only moments in which war wasn’t overwhelming.”

“I ain’t rotten fruit; I a man.”

“No one would remember her name, but she had become a larger spirit now: head bigger, hips wider, and whatever the hurt. All the ones who had come before her simply pumping through her heart and they had found a place to be in the caverns of her throat. There, she recalled her voice.”

“Only one question: What to do when the cavalry arrives? Only one thing to do: With every drop of blood: Rebel!”

“Robert Jones, Jr., was born and raised in New York City. He received his BFA in creative writing with honors and MFA in fiction from Brooklyn College. He has written for numerous publications, including The New York TimesEssenceOkayAfricaThe Feminist Wire, and The Grio. He is the creator of the social justice social media community Son of Baldwin. Jones was recently featured in T Magazine‘s cover story, “Black Male Writers of Our Time.” The Prophets is his debut novel.”

His website


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Reading the Forward Collection Series from Amazon

Hello, friends! I hope you’re having a good week.

This week, while watching BookTube, I watched BookswithEmilyFox reading this collection of short stories from authors I recognized. I don’t typically read science fiction, but I’m trying to branch out. Anyway, I had such high hopes for this collection. It didn’t really come through for me but that’s okay. I honestly didn’t know what to expect, and I went in blind to every story. I’m not going to give you much information about each book because I found it fun to go in blind to each one, and I think it would benefit you as well.


Ark (Forward Collection #1) by Veronica Roth

39 pages

“On the eve of Earth’s destruction, a young scientist discovers something too precious to lose, in a story of cataclysm and hope by the #1 New York Times bestselling author of the Divergent trilogy.”

Rating: 3 out of 5.

A very average short story that tried to be more thought provoking than it probably needed to be. I understood where the author was coming from, but I didn’t think it worked with this specific short story. There was no background on the characters except for the little bit the author offers us. Samantha, the main character who helps with the Ark Project in Svalbard, is very melancholy in nature while not at the same time. I received mixed signals from her. It seemed like a very dark story with the end of the world looming over the few people left on Earth, meanwhile it was a story filled with hope. It’s a good contrast, but I think I needed a long story if that’s the case. Overall, it was an okay start to this collection. It’s a rocky journey from here, though.


Summer Frost (Forward Collection #2) by Blake Crouch

75 pages

“A video game developer becomes obsessed with a willful character in her new project, in a mind-bending exploration of what it means to be human by the New York Times bestselling author of Recursion.”

Rating: 4 out of 5.

This one, by far, is the creepiest short story in this collection. I hate the thought of AI becoming smarter than humans. The dry, scientific writing works for the story, otherwise I wouldn’t have given it four stars. I thought there was a lot of good discussion about gender and how we as humans assume gender so easily. No, there’s not a lot of character development, but the uneasiness this book provides really makes up for that. The downfall of this short story is the ending. I found it to wrap up at the last second and it seemed a little cheap. I know this wouldn’t be everyone’s cup of tea, but I’d say go ahead and read it if you want to feel uncomfy for an hour.


Emergency Skin (Forward Collection #3) by N.K. Jemisin

33 pages

“What will become of our self-destructed planet? The answer shatters all expectations in this subversive speculation from the Hugo Award–winning author of the Broken Earth trilogy.”

Rating: 3 out of 5.

Ugh, I thought for sure this would be my favorite one out of all six stories. Honestly, it’s at the bottom above The Last Conversation by Tremblay. I will give it points for how eye-opening this one is. There’s a good discussion about how terrible humans are to the Earth. I thought the point of view worked, but I was extremely aggravated by the “voice inside your head.” I understood why that was there, but there had to be a different way to do it. Maybe I’m being too harsh, but I can’t raise my rating. There’s a lot to unpack in this story, so if you’re interested, then I’d recommend you give it a shot.


You Have Arrived at Your Destination (Forward Collection #4 by Amor Towles

46 pages

“Nature or nurture? Neither. Discover a bold new way to raise a child in this unsettling story of the near future by the New York Times bestselling author of A Gentleman in Moscow.”

Rating: 4 out of 5.

This is my favorite one from this collection, and I’m just as shocked as you are. I thought this one had the best character development, plot, and unsettling dialogue. The only thing that made me drop a star was the ending. I don’t think I understood what it all meant. It’s one of my pet peeves with books. I hate being intrigued just to catch “eh” feelings at the end. It makes me want to scream. Anyway, it was my favorite……that’s all.


The Last Conversation (Forward Collection #5) by Paul Tremblay

56 pages

“What’s more frightening: Not knowing who you are? Or finding out? A Bram Stoker Award–winning author explores the answer in a chilling story about identity and human consciousness.”

Rating: 1 out of 5.

This book didn’t slap, and that’s putting it kindly. I don’t even know what I read and why, but I’m not here for it. There was nothing intriguing about this! I don’t want to drag this anymore, so I’ll just end it with: don’t read this.


Randomize (Forward Collection #6) by Andy Weir

28 pages

“In the near future, if Vegas games are ingeniously scam-proof, then the heists have to be too, in this imaginative and whip-smart story by the New York Times bestselling author of The Martian.”

Rating: 3 out of 5.

The amount of conniving characters in this one was a nice change of pace since it is the last story. There’s quantum physics, casinos, and random number generators. If that doesn’t make you want to read it, then I don’t know what will. I thought the writing was fine. I think this one has the lowest rating out of all of them, but I’m not really sure why. I still recommend it.


If I had to rank them from most favorite to least favorite:

You Have Arrived at Your Destination, Summer Frost, Randomize, Ark, Emergency Skin, and The Last Conversation.

If you’ve read any of these, you should let me know your thoughts in the comments.


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The Anti-TBR Tag

A popular book everyone loves but you have no interest in reading?

Ready Player One by Ernest Cline

A classic book / author you don’t have an interest in reading?

The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway / Ernest Hemingway, himself. I’ve never had an interest, and I didn’t even do the required reading in high school.

An author whose books you have no interest in reading?

I’m going to name a few: James Patterson, Jodi Picoult, Cassandra Clare, and Mark Z. Danielewski.

A problematic author whose books you have no interest in reading?

I read Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher in high school, and I’ve never had interest in anything else by him anyway.

I had one of Sherman Alexie’s books on my TBR this year (The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian), but I don’t feel compelled to read it after reading about how he’s been racist and how he acts terribly toward women. Check out this blog post if you want to know more.

An author you have read a couple books from and decided their books are not for you?

Sorry to anyone who is a die-hard fan, but Stephen King is just not for me. I read It, Sleeping Beauties, The Institute and didn’t enjoy any of them. I tried reading Rose Madder and The Long Walk, but I couldn’t get into them. He’s just not for me and that’s okay.

A genre you have no interest in OR genre you tried and couldn’t get into?

Erotica or magical realism. I’ve tried to read from both genres, and I just don’t think they’re ones I’ll ever fall in love with.

A book you bought but will never read OR a library book you borrowed but returned unread?

The Jungle Books by Rudyard Kipling. I think I have better odds of reading War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy.

A series you have no interest in reading OR a series you started but have dnf’d?

I have no interest in reading the Nevernight series. I’ve tossed around the idea of it, but it’s probably not going to happen.

If I don’t enjoy Across the Green Grass Fields by Seanan McGuire, then I’m giving up on that series. It just isn’t for me, and really wasn’t for me the entire time. The only ones I enjoyed were the first and third one.

A new release you have no interest in reading?

One Last Stop by Casey McQuiston. I didn’t care for Red, White & Royal Blue, and I don’t even have interest in her new one. McQuiston was one of those hyped authors that I thought I had to read from. I initially gave her first book four stars, but later realized it was more like a 3 or lower.


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4 Reasons I Personally Love Audiobooks

Hello, friends! I’m enjoying writing blog posts, and I’m trying to think of different things I can discuss. I don’t want this to just be a review blog, as much as I love writing and reading reviews. Today, this post is dedicated to audiobooks and just how much I love them.


They help me focus and understand more.

I know this sounds crazy since I’m 24-years old, but I have always flopped with reading comprehension. I take notes while reading because I fear I won’t remember or understand what’s happening. I’ve always been into creating art (thanks mom). Audiobooks have changed my reading game! It helps me block out sounds around me and focus on the words on the page. If you struggle with something similar, try audiobooks.

I read more.

I’m the slowest reader I know. That’s not a negative problem to have, but it would take me weeks to read one book, and I struggle to stay interested after reading something for so long. I think that audiobooks have helped me speed up my reading, but I just love having someone read to me, regardless. It also occupies the time you can’t use to sit and read a book.

I can imagine more.

When I hear (most) narrators use different voices for different characters, I feel like I can imagine them better. It helps me make a connection with the characters that I may not form when I only physically read the book. I can picture the scenery and experience the type of atmosphere the story creates. Is that just me? I hope not.

Helps me get through my dreaded commute.

No, I don’t have a super long commute to work, but I also don’t live five minutes away. I’m in the vehicle for about an hour a day, give or take. That’s a whole hour I can listen to something other than my own thoughts. I’m not huge into music, so audiobooks and podcasts will typically trump a jam session.


Don’t let anyone tell you that listening to an audiobook is not considered reading. It 100% counts toward your reading goals. They just make reading fun, and may help if you’re struggling with assigned reading. Give it a shot!

Let me know what you think of audiobooks in the comments!


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End of the Year Reading Wrap Up – 2020

My stats were easier to find this year because I used the Book Blogger / Reader Spreadsheet that Kal @ Reader Voracious creates every year. It’s amazing, and filling it out is like therapy. I didn’t start it until September, so I didn’t have a lot of blog stats, but I did get in all of my reading stats that I wanted to. I’m not sure when she comes out with the new ones every year, but I’m definitely looking forward to it!

With that being said, I’m not trying to focus too much on stats—reading or blog wise. Reading started to feel like a chore this year, and I felt so hyper-focused on the stats on EVERY social media platform and how many books I was reading. I was trying to fly through books when I didn’t need to. I don’t retain as much information when I do that. It just became a daunting task. SO, I’m trying to end this year on a positive note. Yes, I have stats, but they’re not as detailed as I would have wanted at the beginning of year. I hope you all understand and enjoy this post anyway!

**Click on book covers to view original source


58/55 books read

3.5 avg rating

302 avg page count per book

17, 513 total page count

Top 10 Favorites

Historical Fiction

Published: 1/14/20 by St. Martin’s Press

391 pages

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Fantasy

Published: 3/17/20 by Tor Books

398 pages

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Autobiography

Published: 10/20/20 by Crown Publishing

308 pages

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Science Fiction

Published: 9/3/19 by Harper Voyager

153 pages

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Historical Fiction

Published: 9/10/19 by Harper

450 pages

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Thriller

Published: 7/21/20 by Berkley

384 pages

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Nonfiction

Published: 1/24/2012 by Crown Publishing

333 pages

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Historical Fiction

Published: 9/26/95 by Vintage

460 pages

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Historical Fiction

Originally published in 1928

240 pages

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Young Adult Science Fiction / Fantasy

Published: 11/26/19 by Delacorte Press

457 pages

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Most Disappointing


That’s a wrap, folks! It hasn’t been the best reading year, or year in general, but I found some gems. I got to read a book by Matthew McConaughey, so technically, my work here is done. *mic drop*

I hope you’re all having a great holiday. If you don’t celebrate anything, then just have a great end of the year / new year. All I ask of anyone is to be safe!


If you enjoyed this, then give it a like and follow my blog and other social media. Be respectful and happy reading!

NetGalley November — Learning From My Mistakes

Hello, friends! I have a confession to make and I’m sure you all can tell from the title of this post. November is going to be dedicated to the (long) list of NetGalley books that I need to read. I’m not going to discuss the amount because I went through a phase when I first started blogging where I would request everything. I feel terrible about it, but I’m slowly trying to make up for that. I’m writing this so I can hold myself accountable. If you have books from NetGalley that you need to read then let this be motivation. You got this!

For the month of November, the majority of the books I read will be from my NetGalley checklist. I don’t want to put myself in a slump, so I’m not going to commit to only picking up NetGalley books. I have a good variety to choose from, and I’d say a lot of them have already been published, but I’ll do my best to make sure I balance the old with the upcoming. This will be a list of nine books I want to knock off of my list.

Thank you to all the publishers for the early digital copies in exchange for an honest review!

*click on images for the link to their Goodreads page*

“But when she enlists Red in her mission to rebel, she learns things about him that no spy session could teach her. Like why he clearly resents Chloe’s wealthy background. And why he never shows his art to anyone. And what really lies beneath his rough exterior…”

Published: 11/5/19 by Avon

3.86 average rating on GR

369 pages

Genre: Romance (own voices)

“In this dark, suspenseful thriller, Alex North weaves a multi-generational tale of a father and son caught in the crosshairs of an investigation to catch a serial killer preying on a small town.”

Published: 8/20/19 by Celadon Books

4.06 average rating on GR

355 pages

Genre: Thriller

“An addicting and twisty debut about an apartment building devastated by the disappearance of a teenage girl–and by the secrets that won’t be kept behind each closed door–that will thrill fans of Lisa Jewell and Shari Lapena.”

Publication: 2/16/21 by G.P. Putnam’s Sons

4.50 average GR rating

304 pages

Genre: Suspense / Thriller

“Exploring the psychological dynamics of the relationship between a precocious yet naïve teenage girl and her magnetic and manipulative teacher, a brilliant, all-consuming read that marks the explosive debut of an extraordinary new writer.”

Published: 3/10/20 by William Morrow

4.05 average GR rating

373 pages

Genre: Contemporary Fiction

“A young girl discovers a portal to a land filled with centaurs and unicorns in Seanan McGuire’s Across the Green Grass Fields, a standalone tale in the Hugo and Nebula Award-wining Wayward Children series.”

Publication: 1/12/21 by Tor.com

4.22 average GR rating

176 pages

Genre: Fantasy

“Showing that truth is stranger than fiction, Sylvain Neuvel weaves a scfi thriller reminiscent of Blake Crouch and Andy Weir, blending a fast moving, darkly satirical look at 1940s rocketry with an exploration of the amorality of progress and the nature of violence in A History of What Comes Next.”

Publication: 2/2/21 by Tor.com

3.11 average GR rating

304 pages

Genre: Science Fiction

“A middle grade fantasy adventure about a trio of royal siblings who unlock a long-forgotten magical language in their bid to reclaim their stolen throne.”

Published: 9/8/20 by Balzer + Bray

4.18 average GR rating

368 pages

Genre: Middle Grade Fantasy

“Alisha Rai returns with the first book in her sizzling new Modern Love series, in which two rival dating app creators find themselves at odds in the boardroom but in sync in the bedroom.”

Published: 8/6/19 by Avon

3.68 average GR rating

387 pages

Genre: Romance

“A hauntingly powerful novel about how the choices we make can stay with us forever, by the award-winning author of The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August and 84K.”

Published: 11/12/19 by Orbit

3.74 average GR rating

420 pages

Genre: Fantasy


I love NetGalley and I’m so happy that it’s a resource readers can use, but sometimes it can get out of hand. Publishers allow you to read the novels early so you can review them and get the word out. It gives other readers something to go off of rather than going into a book blind. That’s why I want to do my best to read the books I requested. There are some on my checklist that I don’t want to read anymore, and I will figure out what I want to do when I get to them (there are only a few options). My end goal, really, is to get my percentage past 80, which is a lot of books. Wish me luck!

Do you use NetGalley or Edelweiss? Do you have a habit of requesting too many books at once or is it just me *nervous laughter*?


If you enjoyed this, then give it a like and follow my blog and other social media. Be respectful and happy reading!

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Book Review for Crazy Stupid Bromance by Lyssa Kay Adams – HAPPY PUB DAY!

Crazy Stupid Bromance (Bromance Book Club #3) by Lyssa Kay Adams

352 pages

ISBN: 9781984806130

Publication: 10/27/20 by Berkley

Genre: Contemporary Romance

Rating: 4 out of 5.

B&N | Book Depository

“Alexis Carlisle and her cat café, ToeBeans, have shot to fame after she came forward as a victim of a celebrity chef’s sexual harassment. When a new customer approaches to confide in her, the last thing Alexis expects is for the woman to claim they’re sisters. Unsure what to do, Alexis turns to the only man she trusts—her best friend, Noah Logan.

Computer genius Noah left his rebellious teenage hacker past behind to become a computer security expert. Now he only uses his old skills for the right cause. But Noah’s got a secret: He’s madly in love with Alexis. When she asks for his help, he wonders if the timing will ever be right to confess his crush.

Noah’s pals in The Bromance Book Club are more than willing to share their beloved “manuals” to help him go from bud to boyfriend. But he must decide if telling the truth is worth risking the best friendship he’s ever had.

A hacktivist and a cat café owner decode the friend zone in this romantic comedy from the author of Undercover Bromance.”


Thank you NetGalley and Berkley for the early digital copy in exchange for an honest review.

I don’t have the finished copy, so I will not be including any quotes.

The Bromance Book Club | Undercover Bromance

I meant to post this before it came out, but other things came up. Happy pub day! Go pick this up. 🙂

› There is so much love in my heart for this series. I’m so happy I found a romance series that I’m not bored with. I know there is one more after this one about Vlad, but I’m not sure about anything past that. I honestly think four books would be enough for this series. There’s really only one other person I could think of to write about, and that’s Colton. Do I want to read about that egomaniac, though?

› Why isn’t there more Noah Logans in the world? He’s so genuine and kind. I love how much he cares for Alexis, even though it does get to be a bit much. There’s also one long stretch of them doing the dirty, and it seems exhausting.

› The story that runs alongside the romance is interesting with this one. Alexis’s mother died and her father is non-existent until her sister shows up at the cafe. Alexis thinks she’s a victim of abuse when she really just wants to discuss their father’s health. Did I care about Elliott and his garbage kidney? No, not really. I honestly wanted more of Noah and Alexis.

› I will say that the excerpts from the book club pick feel a little forced at this point. I think if you’re going to make a series about a book club then there should be more of it sprinkled throughout. Otherwise, just leave it out. I don’t know if people don’t enjoy books inside a book, but I figured that was the whole point of the series. That’s probably my main complaint.

› I know this isn’t the most in-depth review, but it’s just a fun entertaining romance. There’s nothing crazy about it other than the stupid bromance. See what I did there? I highly recommend this series if you want to get out of a slump. I also think these are good starter romances for people who aren’t used to steam. Pick this up when it comes out, or at least start the series.

Lyssa Kay Adams is the pen name of an award-winning journalist who gave up the world of telling true stories to pen emotional romances. She’s also a diehard Detroit Tigers fan who will occasionally cheer for the Red Sox because her husband is from Boston.

Lyssa lives in Michigan with her family and an anxiety-ridden Maltese who steals food and buries it around the house and who will undoubtedly be a character in a future book.


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Book Review of The Boys’ Club by Erica Katz

The Boys’ Club by Erica Katz

416 pages

ISBN: 9780062961488

Published: 8/4/20 by Harper

Genre: Contemporary Fiction

Rating: 3 out of 5.

B&N | Book Depository

*click on photos to view original source*

Sweetbitter meets The Firm in this buzzy, page-turning debut novel—already optioned to Netflix—about sex and power in the halls of corporate America.

Alex Vogel has always been a high achiever who lived her life by the book—star student and athlete in high school, prelaw whiz in college, Harvard Law School degree. Accepting a dream offer at the prestigious Manhattan law firm of Klasko & Fitch, she promises her sweet and supportive longtime boyfriend that the job won’t change her. Yet Alex is seduced by the firm’s money and energy . . . and by her cocksure male colleagues, who quickly take notice of the new girl. She’s never felt so confident and powerful—even the innuendo-laced banter with clients feels fun. In the firm’s most profitable and competitive division, Mergers and Acquisitions, Alex works around the clock, racking up billable hours and entertaining clients late into the evening. While the job is punishing, it has its perks, like a weekend trip to Miami, a ride in a client’s private jet, and more expense-account meals than she can count. 

But as her clients’ expectations and demands on her increase, and Alex finds herself magnetically drawn to a handsome coworker despite her loving relationship at home, she begins to question everything—including herself. She knows the corporate world isn’t black and white, and that to reach the top means playing by different rules. But who made those rules? And what if the system rigged so that women can’t win, anyway? 

When something happens that reveals the dark reality of the firm, Alex comes to understand the ways women like her are told—explicitly and implicitly—how they need to behave to succeed in the workplace. Now, she can no longer stand by silently—even if doing what’s right means putting everything on the line to expose the shocking truth.


Thank you to HarperCollins and NetGalley for the early digital copy in exchange for an honest review.

Either you’re going to be perfect or you’re going to be alive. Can’t be both.

› There’s something about lawyers / courtroom settings that really intrigues me. I’ve had my eyes on this once since it was first put on NetGalley, and I immediately requested it.

› The beginning of the book is actually really good. It starts off with her getting ready for her first day at the new law firm, and she can’t decide what to wear. It’s also very clear that her boyfriend, Sam, doesn’t 100% support her. He definitely hesitates in the support department. After her first day, she questions whether she even wants to be a lawyer. It’s mainly because she made a lot of mistakes, such as accidentally calling 911.

› Once she moves up to M&A, the book completely changes. I still turned the pages because it continued to keep me interested, but Alex managed to get on my very last nerve. She tries to get into M&A for the wrong reasons. She does it to prove she’s “better” at the job than Carmen—another new girl at the firm that Alex went to law school with. Given, Carmen wasn’t always good to Alex. That’s what I got out of it, anyway. That feeling went away as she got to know the men in the firm. She became a morally gray character, which doesn’t make or break a book for me, but she wasn’t an interesting one. She just cheats on her boyfriend with a man who sleeps around. That’s a hard no for me.

› There is quite a bit of sexual harassment / assault in this book, which didn’t surprise me. Of course, the egotistical men of the novel made it seem like Alex had to endure it.

I watched his lips moving, and in a crystal-clear moment, I saw it: my cheating with a serial adulterer, my assault by a rich scumbag, my entire existence in corporate America, was just so . . . typical.

› It becomes clear to her that she doesn’t have to put up with it, but that happens at the end of the novel. Unfortunately, this book doesn’t have the type of ending I expected. I didn’t really know where the book was going when I started it. It’s not one that has a clear end in sight. I will say that there’s no justice, but there is a glimmer of hope and determination. That’s all I’ll say about that. That doesn’t mean that I enjoyed the ending. I thought it was on the cheaper side, and it didn’t make the novel anymore interesting. It just didn’t seem to fit with the tone of the book.

› One last note about what’s inside: Gary Kaplan can take a long walk off a short pier. Thank you and goodnight. 🙂

› I didn’t have any issues with the writing style. I wouldn’t mind reading another novel by Katz. I believe she’s also involved in law. I can’t confirm or deny that the information about law is right or wrong, as I am not a lawyer. I will say that the jargon went right over my head, as I had expected.

› Would I recommend this one? Sure. I know a lot of people enjoyed it.

Triggers: cheating, lying, sexual assault / harassment, drugs.

Erica Katz is the pseudonym for a graduate of Columbia Law School who began her career at a major Manhattan law firm. A native of New Jersey, she now lives in New York City, where she’s employed at another large law firm. The Boys’ Club is her first novel.


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New Release Tuesday (10/13/20)

Hello, friends! I’m back at ya with another New Release Tuesday. The only problem is that there’s only one book on my radar, and it’s not even one I’m highly anticipating.

In 1893, there’s no such thing as witches. There used to be, in the wild, dark days before the burnings began, but now witching is nothing but tidy charms and nursery rhymes. If the modern woman wants any measure of power, she must find it at the ballot box. But when the Eastwood sisters–James Juniper, Agnes Amaranth, and Beatrice Belladonna–join the suffragists of New Salem, they begin to pursue the forgotten words and ways that might turn the women’s movement into the witch’s movement. Stalked by shadows and sickness, hunted by forces who will not suffer a witch to vote-and perhaps not even to live-the sisters will need to delve into the oldest magics, draw new alliances, and heal the bond between them if they want to survive. There’s no such thing as witches. But there will be. 

I recently finished reading The Ten Thousand Doors of January by this author, and I thought it was very okay. The only thing keeping me interested is the beautiful cover and the fact that it’s not a portal fantasy. If you read my review for the other book you’d know my feelings about portal fantasies. Anyway, happy pub day!


If you’ve read this one, then let me know your thoughts!


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Dewey’s Pre-Readathon To-Be-Read List

Dewey’s is hosting a pre-readathon before the actual 24-hour readathon on October 24th. I gave you a link to the announcement page where it describes everything about it. I don’t think I’ll complete 15 books by the 24th, but I’ll try to get to a few of these. I picked ones that were already high on my list.

*click on photos to view GR page*

Read a long book (over 500 pages)

I read the first book, The Lies of Locke Lamora, and I absolutely loved it. There’s no doubt that I’ll love this one, too. It has an amazing cast of characters and the plot is *chef’s kiss.*

Read a short book (under 250 pages)

I picked this up from a used bookstore not too long ago. I’ve always wanted to read Toni Morrison, but I never knew where to start. I think I’ve decided it’s going to be this one.

Pick 5 of your favorite genres and enter them in a randomizer. Read a book in that genre

The randomizer chose contemporary. My friend gifted me an ARC of this one, and I’ve been wanting to pick it up ever since.

Read a “spooky” book (your own definition of spooky is fine)

I’m not sure if this is spooky, but the synopsis is so weird. I’m not sure what to expect with this one. All I know is that it’s been getting a lot of hype lately.

Read a book that is 75% one color on the cover

I’ve heard that this book has a lot of sex talk. I’ve also heard that it talks about the porn industry, which isn’t talked about in books. I’m interested to see what it has to say.

Read a book that was published in the last 18 months

This was published in September, and it sounds like such a fun YA novel. I don’t read YA often, so I try to choose carefully.

Read a book that was published more than 100 years ago

I mainly just want to read this and watch the movie everyone raved about.

Read a book set in the Fall or with a cover that looks like it is Fall (leaves changing, etc)

This book probably doesn’t give anyone else Fall vibes, but I think it’s very Fall. I think it’s mainly the orange / yellow flower.

Read a book set in the Spring or with a cover that looks like it is Spring (trees blooming, etc)

If that cover doesn’t scream Spring, then I don’t know what does. It’s so bright and blue / green. I’ve also heard wonderful things about this author.

Read at least 75% of a book when it’s dark outside

I mainly read at night, so this challenge won’t be hard at all. This one is bound to be an adventure. There’s no way Turton wouldn’t deliver.

Read at least 75% of a book outside (please social distance… a park or back patio will do fine)

I’ve watched the tv show twice, and I fell in love. I knew I wanted to read the graphic novel series that takes place after the show. So far, so good.

Read a book with an animal (real or made up) on the cover

I can’t believe I haven’t read this one, yet. The cover obviously has a little tea dragon on the front cover. These graphic novels are just too adorable. I love them so much.

Read a book with a main character or author whose first name starts with the same letter as your first name

My name starts with a V and so does Schwab’s. I have this one checked out from the library, and I plan to buddy read it with a friend.

Take five books you really want to read and put them in a randomizer and read whichever one is chosen

I started and finished The Duchess Deal in one day. I thought it was well done. I’m excited to read book two in this series. This is actually the one I heard about first.

Read a book that is set in a location you wish you could visit or live in. This location can be real or imaginary

Why do I keep putting this one off? I’m sure you’re all sick of reading about it from me. It’s one of my most anticipated reads of 2020. It takes place in Australia, and I’ve always wanted to visit.


Are you participating in Dewey’s 24-hour Read-a-thon?


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