Top Ten Tuesday: Books I’m Thankful For

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Rules for Top Ten Tuesday:

Every Tuesday there is a new topic that you will find over at That Artsy Reader Girl.

The goal is to give your top ten answers, but you can give as many as you want. Put a twist on the topic to make it work for you!

Most importantly, make sure you link to the host (That Artsy Reader Girl ↑).

  1. Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng: One of the first adult contemporaries I’ve ever read. I started off 2018 with a bang, and I bought two copies of it. One is signed—not to brag or anything (lol).

2. The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho: I actually listened to this on audio when I started my first job in Kentucky. I listened to it three times in one day. It was so comforting that I asked for the physical copy for my birthday. My sister bought me the pretty cover, which I have since tabbed to pieces.

3. The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien: Do I have to explain why I’m thankful for this?

4. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J.K. Rowling: I was nervous to read this because of the hype. When I made my decision to give it five stars, I almost couldn’t believe it. It truly is a good book.

5. The Weight of Ink by Rachel Kadish: This is just the best book I have ever read. It’s a commitment, but it’s so worth the read. I would love to reread it at some point in the future.

6. Birthday Girl by Penelope Douglas: Started my love for romance novels. I had read The Kiss Quotient and told myself I’d never read another. Penelope Douglas knows how to write romance.

7.The Golden Compass by Philip Pullman: This was different compared to anything else I have ever read. I would love to pick this one back up before the next installment of The Book of Dust comes out.

8. An Object of Beauty by Steve Martin: I only picked this up because it was written by Steve Martin. He truly is a renaissance man in every sense of the term.

9. The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo by Taylor Jenkins Reid: I had stumbled upon this one on Goodreads. I read one review of it, and I took a chance it. I was still reading a lot of young adult books at this time, but I realized that wasn’t the age range I wanted to read.

10. This Tender Land by William Kent Krueger: This was just a rollercoaster of emotions. I was hesitant in the beginning, but Krueger changed my mind immediately!


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WWW Wednesday (11/20/19)

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This is a weekly meme hosted by Taking on a World of Words. You answer three simple questions: What are you currently reading, what have you recently finished reading, and what do you anticipate you’ll read next?

Make sure that you link back to the host!

What are you currently reading?

The Secret Commonwealth (Book of Dust #2) by Philip Pullman

The Starless Sea by Erin Morgenstern

Olive Kitteridge by Elizabeth Strout

What have you recently finished reading?

Giant Days Vol. 1 by John Allison ★★★✩✩

Giant Days Vol. 2 by John Allison ★★★★✩

The Bromance Book Club by Lyssa Kay Adams ★★★★✩

Ask Again, Yes by Mary Beth Keane ★★★★✩

What do you anticipate you’ll read next?

Bunny by Mona Awad

Twice in a Blue Moon by Christina Lauren


If you enjoyed this, then give it a like and follow my blog. Be respectful and happy reading!

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Top Ten Tuesday: Changes in My Reading Life

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Rules for Top Ten Tuesday:

Every Tuesday there is a new topic that you will find over at That Artsy Reader Girl.

The goal is to give your top ten answers, but you can give as many as you want. Put a twist on the topic to make it work for you!

Most importantly, make sure you link to the host (That Artsy Reader Girl ↑).

1. The biggest change is that I don’t really read YA anymore (I’m not saying there is anything wrong with it, it’s just not my cup of tea). When I first started reading on a daily basis, I thought I would only be able to comprehend YA. Now my comprehension struggle is with literary fiction and some SF/F.
2. I have an e-reader now, so e-books are a thing. The big reason I started reading e-books is because I started using NetGalley. It’s such an awesome website, and I am very thankful that it exists!
3. I fell in love with historical fiction. I used to think it was a boring genre that nobody wanted to read.
4. I have started to create TBRs each month. This is a recent change in my reading life.
5. I would never buy books, and now I have two big bookshelves almost full.
6. I read multiple books at once. It’s quite difficult for me to only focus on one book at a time. Life is too short to only read one book lol.
7. I listen to audio books A LOT now.
8. I buddy read sometimes.
9. I do read a little bit faster.
10. I participate in the Goodreads Reading Challenge every year.


If you enjoyed this, then give it a like and follow my blog. Be respectful and happy reading!

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Genre Spotlight | Historical Fiction

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I’m sure this has been done a thousand times, but I wanted to start a little series on my blog where I talk about some of my favorite genres to read. I don’t really know how many of these I’ll do, but I thought it would be fun! I hope you enjoy it too.

I never talk about my favorite genres that much, and I figured now is the time. My all-time favorite genre is historical fiction. It always seems to get me out of reading slumps. This post will give you a few reasons why I love it, and why you should at least give it a shot.

There are so many different perspectives that an author can write from. 

I can go into most historical fiction novels and expect a new perspective. I can learn about another little percentage of a different era. Think about all the people who aren’t talked about to this day. We could all write a novel about someone different. Isn’t that super cool to think about? Learning about what they did, and how they impacted the future—our grandparents’ generation, our parents’ generation, and our generation. Just take a second and think about that.

If you choose the correct author, you can learn so much from just a single novel.

There are wonderful authors that do their research (e.g. Ken Follett, Philippa Gregory, etc…). I haven’t read from either of them, but I have heard such great things that they are definitely on my list. I have learned a lot from other books not written by those authors. Love and Ruin by Paula McLain taught me a little about the Spanish Civil War. I Googled a lot while reading that novel. There was so much I didn’t even know, and now I do!

I find the dialogue to be more complex and interesting.

There is nothing worse than boring dialogue! That’s all I really have to say about that. Some books can pull off simple dialogue, but it’s pretty rare. That’s all I really have to say about that.

Lives of ordinary people are brought to light.

This is one of my favorite aspects of historical fiction. There are so many characters based on real people from the past. I know that not a lot of people enjoy that, but I definitely do. A few good examples: Love and Ruin by Paula McLain (Martha Gellhorn) and The Invention of Wings by Sue Monk Kidd (Sarah Grimke). Love and Ruin is one of my favorite books to date.

I never would have learned about these interesting people of history if it weren’t for my love of historical fiction. I can’t thank the genre enough for that.

Conflicts during that time are different compared to today. 

The twenty-first century has its own conflicts, but that past was especially different, and dare I say, more compelling. WWI and WWII were such substantial fragments of history that are perhaps overrated at this point, but I still love reading about it. There is so much to discuss, and so much light to shed on that generation! It’s also fun to see how far we have come, or ways we have fallen backward. I think a lot of it is my urge to learn something new. Books are my favorite way to do that!

– Disclaimer –

I’m not saying that all historical fiction novels are amazing. Yes, there are a ton out there that misrepresent the genre, but you just can’t focus on those. I know this genre won’t be for everyone, but I think it’s worth a shot. These are my opinions, so if you hate historical fiction, then that is 100% okay.

What’s your favorite genre?


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Top Ten Tuesday: Favorite Bookmarks

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Rules for Top Ten Tuesday:

Every Tuesday there is a new topic that you will find over at That Artsy Reader Girl.

The goal is to give your top ten answers, but you can give as many as you want. Put a twist on the topic to make it work for you!

Most importantly, make sure you link to the host (That Artsy Reader Girl ↑).

  1. An actual bookmark
  2. Post-It note
  3. Check-out slip
  4. Bobby pin (don’t ask)
  5. Envelope
  6. Gum wrapper
  7. Little piece of paper I ripped off something
  8. Sometimes I flip it over and leave it open.
  9. Pen/pencil
  10. I can’t think of anymore, but I have used the dust jacket before.

What’s the weirdest bookmark you have ever used?


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Top *Five* Tuesday: Upcoming Releases I’m on the Fence About.

There are a lot coming out that I don’t want to read at all. These are the few that I want to, but I’m so unsure about. I guess we shall see if I even read all of these.

Go check out the blog that hosts Top Ten Tuesday: That Artsy Reader Girl

1. The Dragon Republic (The Poppy War #2) by R.F. Kuang. I didn’t enjoy the last half of the first book.

2. The Hiding Place by C.J. Tudor. I thought The Chalk Man was okay, and that’s why I am on the fence about this one.

3. Lock Every Door by Riley Sager. I’ve read one book by Riley Sager, and it surprisingly wasn’t Final Girls. I should probably read that one before this one.

4. Daisy Jones & The Six by Taylor Jenkins Reid. I love her writing, but I’ve read some reviews and it makes me so nervous to read it. I hope it’s not disappointing.

5. The Toll (Arc of a Scythe #3) by Neal Shusterman. I loved the first book, but I didn’t love the second. Of course I’m still going to read it.


If you enjoyed this, then give it a like, and follow my blog. Be respectful, and happy reading! 

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Top Ten Tuesday: Most Anticipated Releases for the First Half of 2019 (1/8/19)

Top Ten Tuesday is a fun meme that anyone can participate in. If you want to see how to get involved go ahead and check out → That Artsy Reader Girl

I’m playing around with the new layout WordPress has implemented. Please work with me through the many changes that my posts are going through. I hope you all enjoy! 

*All photos were taken from Goodreads. 

Black Leopard, Red Wolf by Marlon James (2/5/19)
House on Fire by Bonnie Kistler (3/12/19)
In an Absent Dream by Seanan McGuire (1/8/19) 
Daisy Jones & the Six by Taylor Jenkins Reid (3/5/19) 
The Dragon Republic by R.F. Kuang (5/2/19) 
Dig by A.S. King (3/26/19)
The Psychology of Time Travel by Kate Mascarenhas (2/12/19)
We Hope for Better Things by Erin Bartels (1/1/19) 
The Editor by Steven Rowley (4/2/19)
The Guest Book by Sarah Blake (5/7/19)

If you enjoyed this, then give it a like and follow my blog. Be respectful and happy reading!

Book Review: The Final Empire (Mistborn #1) by Brandon Sanderson

The Final Empire (Mistborn #1) by Brandon Sanderson

Published: July 25, 2006 by Tor Books

541 pages

ISBN: 9780765311788

Genre: Epic Fantasy

Rating: ⭐⭐⭐⭐ 1/2

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Goodreads

In a world where ash falls from the sky, and mist dominates the night, an evil cloaks the land and stifles all life. The future of the empire rests on the shoulders of a troublemaker and his young apprentice. Together, can they fill the world with color once more?

In Brandon Sanderson’s intriguing tale of love, loss, despair and hope, a new kind of magic enters the stage — Allomancy, a magic of the metals.

I loved this novel! I cannot even stress that enough. It’s one of the reasons I love reading fantasy. I explained it the other night to my boyfriend that fantasy novels sometimes feel more realistic than a contemporary. I understand that they are fantasy and very far-fetched, but the characters are much easier to connect to and fall in love with.

I will say that my biggest issue with this genre is that it tends to drag. This book did not do that, at least for me. It had a lot of world, and magic building involved. I think I learned something new in every chapter. Sanderson gives you all the information you need without it being overwhelming. He spreads it out in a way that makes you want to keep turning the pages.

Aside from the world and magic building the characters were so much fun to follow. There were a few that I fell in love with that are now some of my favorite fictional characters (#Sazed). They are a great mixture of witty and serious. It’s just a novel full of bad ass characters, and intense fighting.

My one critique was the ending, unfortunately. It was very anticlimactic, and cringe worthy. I wanted some intense cliff hanger that made me want to pick up the next book immediately. SPOILER: It didn’t. I have to admit that I was a little disappointed, but I’m sure it can only get better from there, right? One can only hope.

Whether I liked the ending or not, I recommend this book 100%. It’s an epic fantasy that isn’t hard to read at all. If you’re nervous about starting, don’t be. I promise you that it will all be worth it!


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My Life in Books Tag!

Found this book tag over at: Elaine Howlin – Literary Blog

I’m not going to tag anyone specific, but if you want to take part in this tag then go right ahead. It’s quite fun!

1. Pick a book for each of your initials.

  • Vicious by V.E. Schwab
  • Scarlet by Marissa Meyer

2. Count your age along your bookshelf, what is it?

  • Still Lives by Maria Hummel

3. Pick a book set in your city/country.

  • American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis

4. Pick a book that represents a place you’d like to travel to.

  • Love and Gelato by Jenna Evans Welch

5. Pick a book that’s your favorite color.

  • A Winter’s Promise by Christelle Dabos

6. Which book do you have the fondest memories of?

  • Dragon Rider by Cornelia Funke

7. Which book did you have the most difficulty reading?

  •  If we are talking about the worst book I have ever read then it would be Come Closer by Sara Gran. It’s short but it was hard to read.
  • The Sellout by Paul Beatty was probably the most difficult book I’ve read. It was at the time I read it, and honestly it’ll probably be the same now.

8. Which book in your TBR pile will give you the most sense of accomplishment when you finish it?

  • War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy

If you enjoyed this then give it a like and follow my blog for future book tags! Be respectful and happy reading!

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Book Review: The Narrow Road to the Deep North by Richard Flanagan

The Narrow Road to the Deep North

Author: Richard Flanagan

Published August 12, 2014 by Knopf

334 pages

ISBN: 9780385352857

Winner of the Man Booker Prize 2014

Rating: ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Amazon | Barnes and Noble | Goodreads

Dorrigo Evans, an Australian surgeon, battles to save prisoners of war in 1943 while being haunted by a love affair with his uncle’s wife, Amy Mulvaney. A WWII novel that explores the brutal point of view of the soldiers. There is a continuous fight between good and evil in this novel, and it will keep you thinking.

I will begin by saying that this novel does not have quotation marks to indicate dialogue. It takes a second to get used to, but I didn’t find it to be a huge issue. I understand how it could be difficult for readers, but there is always an audio book you can listen to.

When a novel wins an award such as the Man Booker Prize, I tend to find myself feeling pressured to enjoy the book. I tried reading Lincoln in the Bardo by George Saunders, and I honestly didn’t understand it. I figured this would be the same case . . . Wrong! I’m not going to lie and say that this book was a breeze to get through, but I enjoyed my time reading it. I want everyone to know that you should never put pressure on yourself when it comes to reading. It should be enjoyable, and if you find it becoming a chore, then there is something wrong.

Anyway, the writing in this novel is well done. I didn’t, however, like how the dialogue was short and choppy, but it didn’t deter me from reading it. There were so many fantastic quotes that I found throughout the book that I had to save!

The characters are quite notable. You always question whether someone is cruel or if they are pressured by war. At the end of the book, you learn more about what happens after the war is over. The ending was probably my favorite part of the novel because you learn so much about the characters you may have hated throughout the whole story. It shows a toll something like war will take on a person. It’s heartbreaking and callous.

If you are thinking about giving this a shot, go for it! I do recommend it for people who like war/WWII novels. It has a little more blood and gore in it than most war novels I have read, and it made it stand out from the rest.

Quotes:

“They had come to believe that to abandon one man was to abandon themselves.”

“Life was only about getting the next footstep right.”

“Love is shared with others or it dies.”

“There is a pattern and structure to all things. Only we can’t see it. Our job is to discover that pattern and structure and work within it, as part of it.”

“You could go to war with the world, but the world would always win.”


If you enjoyed this then give it a like and follow me for future book reviews. Be respectful and happy reading! 

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